Morning Rant

Thoughts on Branding & Marketing. What makes you unique? What sets you a part? How are you telling that story to create a positive emotional response?

 

A Client Story: Tim Storey

Over the past handful of years, I’ve worked with Life Coach, Author and Speaker, Tim Storey to develop his unique brand. Tim has his hands both in the church world as a gifted speaker and author, and in “Hollywood” as a unique advisor and life coach to some of today’s most powerful people. Both circles come with their own perceptions and judgements. Tim found himself connected to empowering spiritual movements all over the world, as well as intimate meetings with creatives like Robert Downey Jr, Lee Iacocca, Kanye West, Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder, John Paul DeJoria, Grant Cardone, Steve Harvey, and more. His audience was struggling to label him.

The process was simple (yet, painstakingly difficult at times), focus on Tim Storey, the person. What is his narrative? Why is he unique? What sets him apart from the other preachers, motivational speakers and self-help authors. The answer, him. No one can do Tim Storey like he does. He has his own style, stories, and insight and strives to get others to see the uniqueness within themselves.

I told Tim, no matter what someone’s background or where they come from, everyone seems to like you when they meet you, when they sit with you for coffee. So we directed the message to getting the audience to get to know Tim. More Facebook/Instagram posts, LIVE videos, behind the scenes videos, and daily rants.

Since then, he has been a featured speaker at PTTOW, Grant Cardone’s 10XCON, Oprah’s Super Soul SessionsSteve Harvey’s Act Like A Success, Mastermind Event, Paul Mitchell’s The Gathering, and more. He is quickly becoming one of the most sought after speakers in the world. He was also featured on Super Soul Sunday with Oprah Winfrey (watch it now)

The Humility of the Artist

I was reading Seth Godin’s blog post this morning and it profoundly hit the nail on the head. Here’s what he said,

It seems arrogant to say, “perhaps this isn’t for you.”

When the critic pans your work, or the prospect hears your offer but doesn’t buy, the artist responds, “that’s okay, it’s not for you.” She doesn’t wheedle or flip-flop or go into high pressure mode. She treats different people differently, understands that she is working to delight the weird, not please the masses, and walks away.

Isn’t that arrogant?

No. It’s arrogant to assume that you’ve made something so extraordinary that everyone everywhere should embrace it. Our best work can’t possibly appeal to the average masses, only our average work can.

Finding the humility to happily walk away from those that don’t get it unlocks our ability to do great work.

Knowing who you are and where you are going is branding. That is the brand, whether the brand is you, a product or service. Being confident in allowing your brand to be itself is not arrogantit is strategic. We must be artists, creators, innovators; we are all original.

I asked a client (singer/songwriter) the other day in a session, “Who was Michael Jackson like?” “What about Prince? Or Miles Davis?” The answer, obviously was no one. They were confident in being themselves and they created forms of music that no one before them had created. We don’t really consider musicians who followed in their footsteps to be legends. Being legendary requires being unique, different. It required these artists to be themselves, not attempting to please everyone, but pushing to have personal integrity and originality in their work.

Michael Jackson Prince Miles DavisNo one can be you. There is no competition to you. When you choose to be yourself and stay focused on a clear path, you don’t really compete with anyone. You now have something unique. Now all you have to do is market, effectively tell your story to a specific demographic. Branding and marketing…defining who you are, where you are going, and sharing that story effectively. 

Enhanced by Zemanta

What Does the Fox Say?

Love what Seth Godin had to say about the newest viral music video on YouTube.

The viral music video of the moment is right here.

The question for the marketer, music or otherwise, isn’t, “what are the hooks and tricks I use to go viral?” No, the question is, “is it worth it?”

What does the fox say has the hooks and tricks in abundance. It has Archie McPhee animal costumes, nonsense words, just the right sort of production values, superfluous subtitles, appropriate silliness. It would probably help the cause to add spurious nudity, but give them points for getting the rest of it right.

To what end?

If your work goes viral, if it gets seen by tens of millions of people, sure you can profit from that. But most of the time, it won’t. Most of the time, you’ll aim to delight the masses and you’ll fail.

I’m glad that some people are busy trying to entertain us in a silly way now and then. But it doesn’t have to be you doing the entertaining–the odds are stacked against you.

So much easier to aim for the smallest possible audience, not the largest, to build long-term value among a trusted, delighted tribe, to create work that matters and stands the test of time.

“Baby bump bump bay dum.”