Should I Be on Facebook?

One of the first things people ask me when they find out what I do is, “so, should I be on (insert any social media platform)?” Small businesses, rockstars, CEOs are all confused about the same thing…what social media platforms should they be using.

social-media-tool-boxSocial media platforms are like tools in a toolbox. They are all beneficial at different times and for different outcomes. Once you come to grips with you are (your brand) and where you are going it makes the decision a bit easier in choosing what to use.

The first step is education. Find out what each tool does. What is Facebook good at? What type of people can you reach through it? What about Instagram? Do people still use Twitter and if so, how? Now think about your target demographic…which platforms will they potentially be engaging?

The second step is being social. Remember, “SOCIAL” media platforms are supposed to be social. Don’t just have one-sided conversations with random folks who are logged in. Engage. Ask questions. Respond. LIKE what they are doing.

Third, be consistent. Not only be consistent in the time you use to engage, but be consistent to your brand…don’t try to be someone you’re not.

The last thing to remember is to not get stuck. Be open to try new platforms. When it comes to technology, what worked last year, may not be the most effective this year.

Good luck and happy engaging.

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Stop Stealing Dreams

A remarkable manifesto about education and how its stealing our children’s willingness to dream. And if you think this only has to with education…then you’re sadly mistaken. It has to with U.S. economics, small business, technical innovations, arts, and how we see our lives. Take the time and read it…it may just change your outlook on creativity.

via Seth Godin’s “Stop Stealing Dreams

The economy has changed, probably forever. School hasn’t.

School was invented to create a constant stream of compliant factory workers to the growing businesses of the 1900s. It continues to do an excellent job at achieving this goal, but it’s not a goal we need to achieve any longer.

In this 30,000 word manifesto, I imagine a different set of goals and start (I hope) a discussion about how we can reach them. One thing is certain: if we keep doing what we’ve been doing, we’re going to keep getting what we’ve been getting.

Our kids are too important to sacrifice to the status quo.

You can get your copy for free

Here are four versions of the manifesto. Pick the one that you need, and feel free to share. To download a file, you’ll probably need the option key or the right click button on your mouse… ask a teenager if you get stuck.
The On Screen version
Use this one to read it on a computer or similar device. Feel free to email to the teachers, parents and administrators in your life.
The Printable edition
This is the same document, but formatted for your laser printer or the local copy shop. You are welcome to make copies, but please don’t charge for it or edit it.
Here’s the Kindle edition
You’ll need to download it and then plug in your Kindle via a USB cable. Drag the file to the Documents folder on your Kindle and boom, you’re done.
The ePub edition
This should work with other types of ebook readers, but I haven’t tested it. Your mileage may vary, and if it doesn’t work, the PDF should.
The manifesto in HTML on the web
Useful for cutting and pasting, I guess. The PDFs are easier to read.
How I built the manifesto, plus back up links
If any of the links above don’t work, you’ll find back up PDF downloads here, as well as a long-ish essay about how I built them.

“Hold onto dreams, for if dreams die, life is like a broken-winged bird that cannot fly.” – Langston Hughes

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