Brands, Art, and Fear

I had the chance to meet Seth Godin about 8 years ago. His perspective of marketing and branding is so unique and spot on. I always say, branding is who you are and where you are going.

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It’s about the humans behind the name, product, or company. It’s about making things. It’s about the creation of ideas and the risk of crushing the status quo. We have to care. We have to love what we create. People don’t want to be fooled by flashy logos and bright colors, only to find out, the soul of the individual, product, or company doesn’t give a sh*t. As the old saying goes, “give a damn, many damns.”

Continue reading “Brands, Art, and Fear”

Engagement

It’s easy to get mesmerized by the Follower and Like numbers on your Instagram account, but learning how well you’re engaging is key.

I always remind my clients that while Social Media is in fact media (algorithms, numbers, ratios), it is very much a social platform. In the real world, social success in not rated by how many people said they were interested in a party, but how many actually showed up and actively engaged. Not how many people you know, but how many friends you feel you can actually call.

Most people are surprised to find that many 500K-2M follower Instagram accounts are averaging any where between 3%-9% engagement. It becomes a numbers game. You spend a lot of money on advertising hoping some will actually engage, increasing your ROI.

For years, Social Media “gurus” have preached that content is king. Well, it’s true, but people want a king that feels accessible. Delivering content that has both value and access is imperative on these platforms. Keep the narrative clear, offer valuable content, keep it as authentic as possible, and make sure it’s something your audience would want to share.

Of course, coupling this with effective boosts and promotions via Instagram and Facebook definitely helps. But that’s for a different day…

Working with Instagram in 2018

I’ve spent some time this last couple of years learning more about Instagram specifically. Before this, I spent most of my time on Facebook for my clients, however looking to reach a younger and more successful market, we dove in. While there is definitely a science to the algorithm, the old saying “Content is King” still defines how well followers engage you and how successful you are in moving those followers to act.

With @timstoreyofficial we worked hard to climb the rungs from 1,000 to 5,000, then to 10,000, then to 50,000, and then to 75,000. We seemed to hit a ceiling at 75,000 and not until getting some advice from an expert who specializes in celebrity accounts, were we able to climb to over 200,000. We didn’t buy followers, we didn’t spend a crazy amount of money (however we did promote posts weekly).

The key was good content that was relevant to more than just our follower base. We became determined to find ourselves on the Explore page as often as possible. We became obsessed with our Discovery percentage and Actions count.

If you want some more information on good Instagram practices, check out this article by Later.com.


How does the Instagram algorithm work? In 2018, the Instagram algorithm has already seen a ton of new changes (and sparked a lot of confusion and frustration)!

This year, the Instagram algorithm seems to be making it even harder than ever for your posts to be seen.

And despite the backlash, there’s no sign of a return to the chronological feed, and there’s a whole new set of rules to play by.

So how do we keep up with all these Instagram algorithm changes?

In the following post, we cover everything you need to know about how the Instagram algorithm works in 2018, and how you can hack the algorithm to get your posts seen! READ MORE

 

What If You Just Stopped

Great question. Seth Godin asked this question today on his blog and it got me thinking again about being irreplaceable. Providing something so unique and necessary that it would be missed if it stopped. What if you stopped today. Would you be missed? Would your service our product be missed? Or would people just move on.

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What would happen to your audience if you shut the doors tomorrow? (I know what would happen to you, that’s not my question… what would happen to them?)

What would happen to your customers and to your prospects if you stopped doing your work?

If you stopped showing up, if you stopped selling them something, would they miss you if you were gone?

If the airline went away, we’d just find another airline. If the cookie cutter politician went away, we’d just vote for someone else. If the typical life insurance agent…

Does it matter if it’s you doing the work?

To Blog or Not to Blog

The saying “Content is King” in marketing is more true than most would like to admit. But have we considered that the content we write actually makes us better. Pausing to conceptualize and effectively communicate a thought in two or three paragraphs pushes our intellect and our depth of understanding concerning ourselves and our brand. And for the most partit’s free!

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What is Value?

I often point out to clients that value is not just about money. It’s about necessity. It’s about urgency. It’s about happiness. We all value different things.

Cadillac-CalaisI remember when I was a child, growing up in a lower-income neighborhood of Miami, learning this lesson. Many of my friends, whose family were on government assistance and struggling to make ends meet, had many of the so called “luxuries” my family could never imagine providing. New Jordans, gold chains, Cadillacs, big TVs, and more. The issue for many of these families was not whether or not they could afford it, but rather what they valued. Some lived in a run down house, but the feeling of driving down the block in a great big Cadillac (Diamond in the back, sunroof top, diggin’ the scene with a gangsta lean, gangsta whitewalls, TV antennas in the back) seemed to make them feel better. Some bought their groceries via food stamps, but doing so, wearing fresh Jordans, seemed to bring a sense of confidence they desired to “make it through” the situations they found themselves in. Keeping up with their impression of Mr. Jones was what was most important to them at that place in life.

Now, I’m not condoning this sort of behavior, however the lesson learned was, people will find a way to make things happen if it is important to them. In a down economy, it’s not necessarily money that changes what we buy, but value. Consumers may not buy what you’re selling simply because they don’t value it. Maybe they value family, rest, their home. Maybe they value luxuries that make them forget, even just a little, during hard times.

Here’s a little of what Seth Godin had to say about value: Continue reading “What is Value?”