Morning Rant

Thoughts on Branding & Marketing. What makes you unique? What sets you a part? How are you telling that story to create a positive emotional response?

 

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A Client Story: Tim Storey

Over the past handful of years, I’ve worked with Life Coach, Author and Speaker, Tim Storey to develop his unique brand. Tim has his hands both in the church world as a gifted speaker and author, and in “Hollywood” as a unique advisor and life coach to some of today’s most powerful people. Both circles come with their own perceptions and judgements. Tim found himself connected to empowering spiritual movements all over the world, as well as intimate meetings with creatives like Robert Downey Jr, Lee Iacocca, Kanye West, Quincy Jones, Stevie Wonder, John Paul DeJoria, Grant Cardone, Steve Harvey, and more. His audience was struggling to label him.

The process was simple (yet, painstakingly difficult at times), focus on Tim Storey, the person. What is his narrative? Why is he unique? What sets him apart from the other preachers, motivational speakers and self-help authors. The answer, him. No one can do Tim Storey like he does. He has his own style, stories, and insight and strives to get others to see the uniqueness within themselves.

I told Tim, no matter what someone’s background or where they come from, everyone seems to like you when they meet you, when they sit with you for coffee. So we directed the message to getting the audience to get to know Tim. More Facebook/Instagram posts, LIVE videos, behind the scenes videos, and daily rants.

Since then, he has been a featured speaker at PTTOW, Grant Cardone’s 10XCON, Oprah’s Super Soul SessionsSteve Harvey’s Act Like A Success, Mastermind Event, Paul Mitchell’s The Gathering, and more. He is quickly becoming one of the most sought after speakers in the world. He was also featured on Super Soul Sunday with Oprah Winfrey (watch it now)

Why I May Not Download Your Free App

homepage-phoneWith Apps becoming more convenient and relatively inexpensive to create via services like Pushpay, AppyPie, and BuildFire, more and more churches, schools, small business, bands, and organizations are creating apps for their supporters.

Of course, this sounds great…FREE Apps! Well, not so fast. Free memory space is limited. Even with a microSD in your Android and extra cloud storage on your iPhone7, you will find yourself asking whether or not the FREE app is worth the space your giving up. That space could be used for more music, videos, pictures, and other apps that you will actually use.

When creating an app for you organization, the most important thing to consider is value. Is the app worth the time and space you are asking your supporters to give up? Is your app basically a memory sucking version of your website or does it offer exclusive functions that can only be accessed via the app?

When creating your app, remember FREE is not always enough reason to download. And even if you’ve convinced them to download, when another app they need comes along, will your app meet the chopping block?

Experimenting with Facebook Live

Tim Oprah4Facebook Live is something that I’ve been experimenting with my client Tim Storey, who’s been a speaker, life coach, & author for over 30 years. After being on Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday and speaking at Super Soul Sessions last year, his audience has grown by leaps and bounds. The strategy is evolving as we go along. The agenda…to reach and engage more people at one time at a low cost.

Earlier this month, we went Live, behind the scenes for 30 minutes, before The Study Hollywood, a unique evening in Hollywood, CA with emerging creatives, entrepreneurs, and dreamers…interviewing attendees, peeking in on sound checks, and expounding on the vision of the event. Then just this week, we experimented with an hour long World Shakers Summit Q&A, Live from Tim’s home office in LA.

The World Shakers Summit Q&A involved live Q&A with fans all over the world and will most likely become a weekly event. We had people from South Africa, Scandinavia, U.K., and throughout the United States. We had over 520,000 reached, over 15,000 views, and over 1,300 comments. We announced it about 8 hours prior to going live (and threw $100 towards boosting the post), with a quick reminder about 40 minutes prior. We had a couple hiccups minutes before going live while we attempted to use Telestream’s Wirecast studio software on an iMac with a NESSIE Blue Mic. Unfortunately, we could not get it to work properly, but because we had to go live, we just used an iPhone 6. We had two people (including myself) going through the live feed and pulling questions (via an LG phone and Macbook Air). To mix it up a bit, we invited a some guests to jump in and add insight and help answer some questions. We received tons of great feedback and had sign up for both his personal One on One Life Coaching, as well as his Visit Tim’s Facebook Page at https://Facebook.com/TimStoreyOfficial.

Although, it’s still fairly new, Facebook Live is going to change the game for brands, individuals, to reach and most importantly engage with a diverse audience…at a very lost cost.

 

Innovation?

Innovation-HeaderInnovation is a unique thing. Depending on perception, an idea can be revolutionary or rhetoric. In the branding world, there are those that focus on the unique, as well as those that just creatively repackage the mundane. Consider with me for moment, that even the most mundane and unimaginative ideas potentially have a unique characteristic. We can be convinced for a time that what we are seeing or hearing is innovative, but time will tell. Every brand should have something unique to offer. Let’s focus on that. As consumers, let’s demand innovation and turn our backs on rhetoric. Let’s strive for new ideas…that will actually revolutionize the way we live. Branding shouldn’t be a con game. It should be rooted in effectively telling real stories of unique ideas. We can do better. Adario Strange of Mashable.com shared this video from Canadian Public Broadcaster, CBC and their series, This is That. Enjoy.

If you’ve ever clicked on an inspirational video link before, you’ve probably seen a TED Talk.

They promise lofty ideas and profound truths, and yes, sometimes they do live up to the hype. But sometimes, well, they don’t.

That’s what this brilliant parody of the speech series focuses on, delivering a blistering takedown of some of the most common onstage methods used to convince the audience that they are witnessing one of the most important speeches they’ve ever seen.

And while it is pretty hilarious, the scary part is that even while the parody talks about nothing, the presentation’s tricks and devices manage to give the empty speech the air of, dare we say, importance.

And for that reason this might be the best (fake) TED Talk we’ve ever seen. If you’re ever invited to give a TED Talk, you now have the perfect cheat sheet for success. 

Adario Strange | Mashable.com

The Crazy Ones

firstmachello“Here’s to the crazy ones. The misfits. The rebels. The troublemakers. The round pegs in the square holes. The ones who see things differently. They’re not fond of rules. And they have no respect for the status quo. You can quote them, disagree with them, glorify or vilify them. About the only thing you can’t do is ignore them. Because they change things. They push the human race forward. And while some may see them as the crazy ones, we see genius. Because the people who are crazy enough to think they can change the world, are the ones who do.” ― Rob Siltanen

Steve Jobs didn’t just create a computer. He created a form of technology that was a direct extension of human imagination. Human imagination is limitless, thus Apple was not limited by technology, but only limited by human creativity.

We must understand that our brand, our product, our non-profit, our corporation, our identity, if set up properly, can only be limited by your ability to create…to imagine. That’s how you change the world. That’s how you make a plastic box with wires, chips, and tubes, revolutionize culture.

Gary Vaynerchuk: Stop Storytelling Like it’s 2007

Please note: This talk contains adult language.

In a world with Vine, Snapchat, and Twitter, how can creatives capture attention to make their voices heard?

In this 99U talk, best-selling author and founder of VaynerMedia, Gary Vaynerchuk breaks down how our work can cut through our current “A.D.D. Culture” — one where we binge-watch entire television seasons in one sitting and prefer texting to phone calls.

“We’ve gotten to a point where everything is on our time,” says Vaynerchuk, “So why is everyone storytelling like it’s 2007 in a 2014 world?” The best digital storytellers, he says, use the social media to “hook” audiences in for the deeper stuff. We should give, give again, and give some more before ever asking for anything from our community. “We have to start respecting the nuances of every platform.”

0:39 no matter what you do, our job us to tell our story
1:44 storytelling in micro moments
4:05 storytelling on social
8:14 quality storytelling always wins
8:34 social networks = distribution
10:30 biggest asset: time
11:56 eyes and ears “attention is the only commodity”
12:58 “give, give, give, ask”
13:30 give people happy stories, make them laugh
14:51 we have to act human.